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Index > United States of America > Pennsylvania > Odor Complaints, Analyzing Air Quality in Washington, Greene Counties

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"Father of Fracking"
George Mitchell
concerns over environmental
impacts of fracking

History of Fracking
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USA Fracking Stories

A Texan tragedy

Gas injection may have triggered earthquakes in Texas

California Lags in Fracking Regulations

All In for California Water

Fracking in Michigan

Fracking in Michigan Potential Impact on Health, Environment, Economy

Hydraulic fracturing of Marcellus Shale

Methane Gas from Marcellus Shale Drilling

Marcellus Shale Gas Economics

Health impacts of Marcellus shale gas drilling

Pennsylvania Fracking

Fracking in Virginia

Lesson From Wyoming Fracking

Water Pollution from Fracking

Hydraulic Fracturing Poses Substantial Water Pollution Risks

Methane in drinking water wells

Abandoned gas wells leak

Natural Gas Leaks Discovered in Boston

Methane Leaks Under Streets of Boston

Methane leaks make fracking dirty

Fracking effects real estate values

Fracking stimulates earthquakes

Protecting Gas Pipelines From Earthquakes

Gas Pipeline Earthquake - Simulations

America's crumbling pipelines

Averting Pipeline Failures

Dangers to Underground Pipelines

Gas Pipelines Could Serve as Wireless Links

Government Action needed on a National Energy Policy

EPA Releases Update on Ongoing Hydraulic Fracturing Study

Solar Booster Shot for Natural Gas Power Plants

Natural Gas Pricing Reform to Facilitate Carbon Tax Policy

Investing in fracking

What Oil Prices Have in Store?

Methane Out, Carbon Dioxide In

Health impacts of Marcellus shale gas drilling

Professor Ingraffea

Anti-Fracking Billboard

Natural Gas Drilling

Threats to Biodiversity

Pronghorn Migration
hindered by gas development

Microbes in a Fracking Site

Protozoa May Hold Key to World Water Safety

Shale Gas Production

Research into the Fracking Controversy

Convert Methane Into Useful Chemicals

Methane Natural Gas Into Diesel

'Natural Gas' at the molecular level

Arctic Methane risks

Arctic Methane Seeps

Great Gas Hydrate Escape

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Methane in the Atmosphere of Early Earth

Methane Natural Gas Linked to Climate Change

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COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
Dept. of Environmental Protection
Commonwealth News Bureau
Room 308, Main Capitol Building
Harrisburg PA., 17120

DEP Responding to Odor Complaints, Analyzing Air Quality in Washington, Greene Counties

Inspectors Sampling to Gauge Possible Impact of Natural Gas Well Operations


04/28/2010 PITTSBURGH -- The Department of Environmental Protection is gathering samples this week to analyze air quality in areas near natural gas operations in Washington and Greene counties.

The department’s efforts, which will be conducted in four phases with each phase lasting one week, are intended to isolate the source of odors that have prompted complaints from residents.

“DEP has received complaints about odors that residents believe are emanating from gas well drilling facilities,” said DEP Southwest Regional Director George Jugovic Jr.

“We take these concerns very seriously and are working to identify the specific source of these odors. If there is a violation of the commonwealth’s air quality laws, the department will take the appropriate enforcement action.

“The bottom line is that any operation subject to our permitting requirements faces real and enforceable emissions limits that are designed to protect the public’s health,” he added.

Under the Air Pollution Control Act, any entity operating a source of odors may be fined up to $25,000.

In the natural gas industry, compressor stations, which are located along natural gas transmission lines and pressurize gas so that it can be piped across great distances, operate under a general permit that limits pollutants by incorporating best available technologies.

During the first phase of a multi-phase effort, DEP’s Mobile Analytic Unit will collect air samples at a site in Washington County removed from active drilling and compare the results with samples taken near active drilling sites in Greene and Washington counties.

DEP will also analyze air samples collected over a 24-hour period using 12 canisters, some of which will be placed on the properties of residents who have complained of odors.

Phases two through four will be conducted within three miles downwind of sites related to gas well drilling in the Marcellus Shale, including active drill sites, compressor stations, drip tanks, well heads, gas well flares and wastewater impoundments.

All sampling will be completed by June.

Samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide.

Canister samples will be analyzed at the DEP laboratory in Harrisburg.




Additional information about the commission can be found on its web site




Media Release: COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA


COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA
Dept. of Environmental Protection
Commonwealth News Bureau
Room 308, Main Capitol Building
Harrisburg PA., 17120

DEP Responding to Odor Complaints, Analyzing Air Quality in Washington, Greene Counties

Inspectors Sampling to Gauge Possible Impact of Natural Gas Well Operations


04/28/2010 PITTSBURGH -- The Department of Environmental Protection is gathering samples this week to analyze air quality in areas near natural gas operations in Washington and Greene counties.

The department’s efforts, which will be conducted in four phases with each phase lasting one week, are intended to isolate the source of odors that have prompted complaints from residents.

“DEP has received complaints about odors that residents believe are emanating from gas well drilling facilities,” said DEP Southwest Regional Director George Jugovic Jr.

“We take these concerns very seriously and are working to identify the specific source of these odors. If there is a violation of the commonwealth’s air quality laws, the department will take the appropriate enforcement action.

“The bottom line is that any operation subject to our permitting requirements faces real and enforceable emissions limits that are designed to protect the public’s health,” he added.

Under the Air Pollution Control Act, any entity operating a source of odors may be fined up to $25,000.

In the natural gas industry, compressor stations, which are located along natural gas transmission lines and pressurize gas so that it can be piped across great distances, operate under a general permit that limits pollutants by incorporating best available technologies.

During the first phase of a multi-phase effort, DEP’s Mobile Analytic Unit will collect air samples at a site in Washington County removed from active drilling and compare the results with samples taken near active drilling sites in Greene and Washington counties.

DEP will also analyze air samples collected over a 24-hour period using 12 canisters, some of which will be placed on the properties of residents who have complained of odors.

Phases two through four will be conducted within three miles downwind of sites related to gas well drilling in the Marcellus Shale, including active drill sites, compressor stations, drip tanks, well heads, gas well flares and wastewater impoundments.

All sampling will be completed by June.

Samples will be analyzed for volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen oxides, hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide.

Canister samples will be analyzed at the DEP laboratory in Harrisburg.




Additional information about the commission can be found on its web site




Media Release: COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA

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